From WILL - Focus -

Encore: In Meat We Trust - An Unexpected History of Carnivore America

In her new book “In Meat We Trust,” author Maureen Ogle argues the reason the meat industry has evolved into what it is today, is because that’s what consumers asked for.

Listen to the Program

(Duration: 51:40)

Meat tenderized the old-fashioned way. The industrial method is a mechanized process involving needles.

Meat tenderized the old-fashioned way. The industrial method is a mechanized process involving needles. (iStockphoto)

When it comes to the meat industry, there is no shortage of opinion about whether large meat producers and packers are good or bad, but how and why did meat production become so controversial? How did we arrive at the production model we use today?

Author Maureen Ogle says that early in American history eating meat was a symbol of status and that consumers demanded low cost meat for their families. That, in addition to industrialization and the move of many Americans from rural areas to cities, is all a part of the very complex history of meat production in America. This hour on Focus, we'll listen back to a conversation she had about her new book “In Meat We Trust,” with host Jim Meadows. We'll hear more about why most of the meat we consume comes from a large factory farm rather than from a small family owned farm and about why Americans eat so much chicken.

Categories: Food